From the Collections of Our Beers

Session American Bitter

Session American Bitter

English brewers were the last in Europe to start using hops in their beer production. They learned about its properties with the arrival of Flemish immigrants to the islands in the 16th century. Previously, they flavored their beers with mixtures of herbs and spices. Porters and stouts were commonly brewed types of beer at that time. Light beers became popular only with the advent of the industrial revolution, which enabled the production of light malts. New beers began to be hopped more and more boldly, taking advantage of its antiseptic properties, allowing for better durability of delicate light Ales. There are quite a few discrepancies in the unambiguous definition of when we can speak of a Bitter style distinct from the usual Pale Ale. Some say a story from 60 years ago, others say it was about 150 years ago, when beer was referred to as "Bitter Ale". One thing is for sure, the differences between "Pale Ale" and "Bitter" are minimal and we can often hear that they relate to the way of packaging - the barrel version of the beer is "Bitter" bottled - "Pale Ale". This does not mean that we will not find Bitter in the bottle - it is possible.

It is an interpretation of the classic English style, for which American varieties of this useful plant were used. Refreshing, light session beer with a clear bitterness with a pleasant, malty-caramel flavor and not too intense saturation. Thanks to this, you can effortlessly drink more than the proverbial "one", having a good time in his company.

RECIPE NO.: XXXVIII

BC_style 

American Bitter

BC_composition 

Water, barley malts (Viennese, mild, Caramunich, Red Crystal), hops (Ekuanot), yeast.

BC_availability 

availability_unavailable

BC_category 

category_one_time

BC_fermentation 

fermentation_top

BC_cuisine 

Non-returnable bottle 0.5 l

BC_temperature 

8-10

BC_nutritionvalues 

Energy: 159 kJ/38 kcal
Fat: <0.0 g
including saturated fats: <0.0 g
Carbohydrates: 0.0 g
including sugars: 0.0 g
Protein: 0.0 g
Salt: 0,000 g
BC_ALCOHOL
3,8
BC_PLATO
10,5
BC_BITTERNESS
32
BC_COLOR
30

Session American Bitter

English brewers were the last in Europe to start using hops in their beer production. They learned about its properties with the arrival of Flemish immigrants to the islands in the 16th century. Previously, they flavored their beers with mixtures of herbs and spices. Porters and stouts were commonly brewed types of beer at that time. Light beers became popular only with the advent of the industrial revolution, which enabled the production of light malts. New beers began to be hopped more and more boldly, taking advantage of its antiseptic properties, allowing for better durability of delicate light Ales. There are quite a few discrepancies in the unambiguous definition of when we can speak of a Bitter style distinct from the usual Pale Ale. Some say a story from 60 years ago, others say it was about 150 years ago, when beer was referred to as "Bitter Ale". One thing is for sure, the differences between "Pale Ale" and "Bitter" are minimal and we can often hear that they relate to the way of packaging - the barrel version of the beer is "Bitter" bottled - "Pale Ale". This does not mean that we will not find Bitter in the bottle - it is possible.

It is an interpretation of the classic English style, for which American varieties of this useful plant were used. Refreshing, light session beer with a clear bitterness with a pleasant, malty-caramel flavor and not too intense saturation. Thanks to this, you can effortlessly drink more than the proverbial "one", having a good time in his company.

RECIPE NO.: XXXVIII

BC_style 

American Bitter

BC_composition 

Water, barley malts (Viennese, mild, Caramunich, Red Crystal), hops (Ekuanot), yeast.

BC_availability 

availability_unavailable

BC_category 

category_one_time

BC_fermentation 

fermentation_top

BC_cuisine 

Non-returnable bottle 0.5 l

BC_temperature 

8-10

BC_nutritionvalues 

Energy: 159 kJ/38 kcal
Fat: <0.0 g
including saturated fats: <0.0 g
Carbohydrates: 0.0 g
including sugars: 0.0 g
Protein: 0.0 g
Salt: 0,000 g
BC_ALCOHOL
3,8
BC_PLATO
10,5
BC_BITTERNESS
32
BC_COLOR
30

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