From the Collections of Our Beers

Brown Porter

Brown Porter

The origin of the porter, like many other beer styles, is highly ambiguous. The most frequently cited story is the theory known as "Three Threads", which states that it was a common practice at the time in English pubs to mix three beers together just before serving. They all had to be delivered in separate barrels, which was obviously difficult. So in 1722, Ralph Harwood, a brewer from Blue Last in Shoreditch, East London, invented one beer that was supposed to taste like a pre-blend. He called it "Entire Butt", which quickly became known as a porter, due to its popularity with London workers and porters. Today we will not find anyone who would know Ralph's original recipe, as no records have been preserved from that period. It is known, however, that it was common practice at the time to divide the mash into three or more parts to yield strong, medium and weak beers. Perhaps Harwood combined them into one, which could explain the origin of his beer name (entire). Probably the first porter was made entirely of brown malt, it was clearly hopped and required a long maturation - four to five months, which additionally resulted in better clarification. Such a method of production meant that not every London brewery-pub could afford to produce this beer. It required having a sufficient number of tanks for long storage. Our brewery's cellars contain 135 lagering tanks, in which the beer can mature freely while waiting for the right moment, so we decided to tackle this style.

A classic English style of beer that quickly became the common liquor of 18th century London. The composition of five malts gives it its proper character, bringing toasted, toasted caramel notes into the beer. Its dark color harmonizes with the chocolate aromas, and the delicate hop bitterness pleasantly emphasizes the smooth texture. Taste a sip to learn a bit of European beer history.

RECIPE NO.: XLVI

BC_style 

Brown Porter/English Porter

BC_composition 

Water, barley malts (Pale Ale, Brown, Biscuit, light chocolate, dark chocolate), barley flakes, hops, yeast.

BC_availability 

availability_available

BC_category 

category_one_time

BC_fermentation 

fermentation_top

BC_temperature 

12-14

BC_confectioning 

Non-returnable bottle 0.5 l

BC_nutritionvalues 

Energy: 179 kJ/43 kcal
Fat: <0.0 g
including saturated fats: <0.0 g
Carbohydrates: 0.0 g
including sugars: 0.0 g
Protein: 0.0 g
Salt: 0,000 g
BC_ALCOHOL
4,5
BC_PLATO
11,7
BC_BITTERNESS
25
BC_COLOR
65

Brown Porter

The origin of the porter, like many other beer styles, is highly ambiguous. The most frequently cited story is the theory known as "Three Threads", which states that it was a common practice at the time in English pubs to mix three beers together just before serving. They all had to be delivered in separate barrels, which was obviously difficult. So in 1722, Ralph Harwood, a brewer from Blue Last in Shoreditch, East London, invented one beer that was supposed to taste like a pre-blend. He called it "Entire Butt", which quickly became known as a porter, due to its popularity with London workers and porters. Today we will not find anyone who would know Ralph's original recipe, as no records have been preserved from that period. It is known, however, that it was common practice at the time to divide the mash into three or more parts to yield strong, medium and weak beers. Perhaps Harwood combined them into one, which could explain the origin of his beer name (entire). Probably the first porter was made entirely of brown malt, it was clearly hopped and required a long maturation - four to five months, which additionally resulted in better clarification. Such a method of production meant that not every London brewery-pub could afford to produce this beer. It required having a sufficient number of tanks for long storage. Our brewery's cellars contain 135 lagering tanks, in which the beer can mature freely while waiting for the right moment, so we decided to tackle this style.

A classic English style of beer that quickly became the common liquor of 18th century London. The composition of five malts gives it its proper character, bringing toasted, toasted caramel notes into the beer. Its dark color harmonizes with the chocolate aromas, and the delicate hop bitterness pleasantly emphasizes the smooth texture. Taste a sip to learn a bit of European beer history.

RECIPE NO.: XLVI

BC_style 

Brown Porter/English Porter

BC_composition 

Water, barley malts (Pale Ale, Brown, Biscuit, light chocolate, dark chocolate), barley flakes, hops, yeast.

BC_availability 

availability_available

BC_category 

category_one_time

BC_fermentation 

fermentation_top

BC_temperature 

12-14

BC_confectioning 

Non-returnable bottle 0.5 l

BC_nutritionvalues 

Energy: 179 kJ/43 kcal
Fat: <0.0 g
including saturated fats: <0.0 g
Carbohydrates: 0.0 g
including sugars: 0.0 g
Protein: 0.0 g
Salt: 0,000 g
BC_ALCOHOL
4,5
BC_PLATO
11,7
BC_BITTERNESS
25
BC_COLOR
65

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